For those of you working in or with larger organizations, this episode is for you. Today I talk to LuAnn Heinen, VP of Workforce Well-being, Productivity and Human Capital for the National Business Group on Health®.

The National Business Group on Health is the nation’s only non-profit organization devoted exclusively to representing large employers’ perspective on national health policy issues and helping companies optimize business performance through health improvement, innovation and health care management.

LuAnn leads the Business Group’s initiatives on employee, family and community well-being and workforce effectiveness. These include Best Employers for Healthy Lifestyles® recognition program, Institute on Innovation in Workforce Well-being and the Institute on Health, Productivity and Human Capital.

In today’s interview, we discuss their model of the drivers of employee well-being, their 2018 trends to watch, what the well-being conversations looks like with their global employers, and future trends. LuAnn leaves us with one tangible tip for employers to consider when attempting to enhance employee well-being.

Also, click here to learn more about my upcoming training, Next Generation Wellness: From Theory to Practice.

Biggest Takeaways You Don’t Want to Miss:
  • NBGH serves employers with 5,000 to 1 million employees on national health policy issues and optimize business performance.
  • They have shifted from the term wellness to well-being.
  • Wellness programs that focus solely on physical health are a thing of the past. They have seen a big focus on financial security.
  • The most successful programs aren’t one size fits all, top down. Their Best Employers Program asks for what they are trying to achieve, what’s suitable for their population and tangible evidence that there is support.
  • Two future trends are the increased use of workplace design to enhance well-being and family leave (caregiving, bereavement, etc.)
Check out these highlights (with timestamps):
  • The NBGH drivers of employee well-being [7:17]
  • How the word “wellness” has become tainted [9:45]
  • Examples of metrics of financial well-being programs [12:45]
  • LuAnn’s take on incentives [14:48]
  • How to connect health and wellness to business performance [19:19]
  • Global employers are looking for consistency and local relevance (along with other trends). [26:00]
  • The role of the employer in obesity [33:30]
  • LuAnn’s thoughts on the ROI conversation [37:15]
  • Her tangible tip for employers to enhance employee well-being [38:39]
Mentioned in this episode:

National Business Group on Health

info@businessgrouphealth.org

wellbeing@businessgrouphealth.org

My new training: https://redesigningwellness.com/impactandinfluence/

Full Bio:

The National Business Group on Health is the nation’s only non-profit organization devoted exclusively to representing large employers’ perspective on national health policy issues and helping companies optimize business performance through health improvement, innovation and health care management.

LuAnn Heinen leads the Business Group’s initiatives on employee, family and community well-being and workforce effectiveness. These include:

  • Best Employers for Healthy Lifestyles® recognition program
  • Institute on Innovation in Workforce Well-being, a source of thought leadership, benchmarking and tactical support to large employers on their health and well-being strategy, programs and communications.
  • Institute on Health, Productivity and Human Capital, a forum for employers to share innovations and best practices related to employee engagement, leave policy, the changing workscape and links between employee health and business performance.

Heinen currently serves on AHRQ’s Evidence-Based Practice Center Expert Panel on Total Worker Health and the STOP Obesity Alliance Steering Committee. She is a regular speaker, media commentator and author.

Heinen earned a Master of Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and an A.B. in human biology with distinction from Stanford University.